“No Drill” Fused Glass Lamp Shade

Using Mold GM76

Cut a 11.75” diameter circle in a standard thickness of clear iridized glass. Cut this circle in half and then cut these portions in half, giving you 4 wedges of a circle.

Using a mosaic nipper, carefully, nip the end tips of these wedges such that when the wedges are placed back together to form a circle, a gap is present in the center of the circle where the tips of the wedges meet. The size of the gap required will depend on the size of the hardware on top of the lamp base that you plan to place the fused glass blank on. When placing the glass wedges back in the circle configuration, you will need to assess which side of each wedge is iridized and place it iridized side up or iridized side down depending on

your artistic preferences. Cut two small fiber paper circles the size of the hardware piece that you will ultimately need the fused glass blank to fit on. An easy way to do this is to press the fiber paper firmly on the threaded end such that an impression is made in the fiber paper. Cut around the outer perimeter of this demarcation to make the fiber paper slightly larger than the threaded end. Place these two pieces of fiber paper on top of each other in the gap created by the nipped tips of the circle wedges. If necessary, nip the ends of the wedge pieces a a little more to make room for these fiber paper pieces.

Irid up? Or Irid down? If you choose to fire the glass with the iridized coating of the base circle down, the glass placed on top of the clear

irid circle will fuse directly into the clear glass as you would expect in a glass to glass fused piece and a lovely iridized finish will remain unbroken on one side of the lamp shade. If you choose to fire the glass with the iridized coating of the base circle up, the glass placed on top of the clear irid circle will resist fusing slightly because of the iridized coating and create more of a gap between the individual pieces. This technique can be very effective. The top portion of the fused mosaic piece

(fig. 2)

Figure 2

illustrates the effect of glass to glass fusing (irid down). The bottom portion of the image illustrates the effect of glass to irid surface fusing (irid up).

Place the clear irid circle base on a piece of Thin Fire paper on a kiln shelf and use pieces of complimentary colors (Light Olive and Caribbean Blue used in illustrations) to cover the clear irid circle base. You can choose to be loose and use mosaic nippers to randomly place pieces of glass here and there filling the clear irid glass below. You can also create a pattern with these random pieces such as found in the image. It is helpful to use clear Elmer’s glue to glue the focal point in place and fill in the area around the focal point with loose pieces.

You can also create uniform geometric wedges to fill the clear irid circle (as shown in the finished lamp). Whichever pattern you choose, make sure to completely cover the seams of the clear Irid glass wedges on the base layer to make sure

that the glass fuses completely together. And make sure to fill up to but not cover the fiber paper gap filler in the center of the clear irid circle.

Fire the project using the following firing schedule:

Segment___ Rate______ Temp (F)_____ Hold____
1 300 1100 10
2 300 1350 30
3 9999 1450 10
4 9999 960 90
5 100 800 15


 

Apply a suitable glass separator to GMXX Lg Lamp Drape according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Center the fused glass blank directly on the Drape mold and fire using the following firing schedule:

Segment___ Rate______ Temp (F)_____ Hold____
1 125 300 15
2 125 1100 20
3 125 1220 40
4 9999 950 60
5 100 820 20
6 100 500 5

Click here for a PDF downloadable tutorial with pictures.